How Much Food To Eat Per Day As Per Ayurveda?

It is really a difficult question to answer. The quantity of food that we take varies based on mood, what we had eaten on previous meal, what is the nature of present meal, whether the previously taken food is completely digested or not etc. Though there are uncertain factors, there are a few general rules that help to answer – how much food to eat per day. 

wholesome food

Based on hunger

The rule of natural urges of Ayurveda states that – you should eat only when you are completely hungry. You should eat till the hunger is satiated. When you are hungry, it indicates that the digestive enzymes are completely produced to optimum extent.  Hence the food that you take will be digested well.

You should eat till the hunger is satiated. While taking food, if you stop feeling hungry, that indicates that the food that you have taken matches with your digestion strength. Hence, it is time to stop eating. If we eat, beyond hunger, then there is extra pressure on digestive enzymes and some part of food may get left undigested. This is the leading cause of indigestion and altered metabolism. This is how ‘Ama’ develops, as per Ayurveda.
Read – Importance Of Diet (Pathya) For Specific Diseases

Sometimes we get fooled by our mind, of hunger, because we like the food on the table very much. In those tough circumstances, we have to be strong enough to listen to our stomach, carefully, ignoring our mind.

Just before the hunger is totally satiated

This is what we hear from our parents and grand parents. We should get up from the bed when there is little sleep still left in our eyes, we should stop eating when there is little hunger still left in our tummies. This argument also has some weight. This practice will always make sure never to over-eat. This practice also gives good control over our mind and sense organs.

Time for the food to get digested

The quantity of food should be such that it gets digested before we take food next time. So, if you are taking only two meals per day, then relatively the quantity of food can be more, so that it keeps you energized throughout the day, till the second meal is taken at night.
If you are accustomed to 4 – 5 meals per day, (which is recommended in diabetics, certain type of gastritis patients etc), the quantity of food should be smaller.

It sounds more like defining the upper limit of food quantity. But it also defines the lower limit as well. Meaning – the food quantity should be not so high that when the next meal time arrives, you are still not hungry and it should not be too low that before next meal time, you already start feeling hungry.

Based on Guru Laghu

Ayurveda classifies foods into two main categories.
Guru –
heavy, those foods that impart heaviness to the body, those, after taking which, you feel heavy, those which take longer time to get digested.
Example: wheat, Fresh wine, black gram, cow pea, lablab bean, mutton, Fish, ash gourd, dates, Jamun fruit, onion, garlic, cow milk, buffalo milk, jaggery, honey, sesame, dairy products, sweet products, fried foods, etc.

Laghu – light, those foods that impart lightness to the body, those, after taking which, you feel light, those which take shorter time to get digested. They are pretty easily digested.
Example: old rice, Green gram, goat milk, camel milk, Chick pea, lentils, grass pea,  lemon, old wine, Moringa (drum stick), pomegranate, cumin seeds, hot water, coconut water, butter milk etc.

Foods that are heavy, should be had less in quantity. – About half to one third of stomach.
Foods that are light, can be had more than those with heavy, up to one third of stomach.

How to decide if one third of stomach is filled up or not? – It is left to your own observation. It is that point of time while you take food, that you no more feel comfortable.

Time of the day

Usual rule is to have good amount of breakfast, moderate amount of lunch and less amount of dinner. Makes sense, because, you will require more calories in the morning,  moderate in the afternoon and lesser at night.

So, these are some of the criteria that are explained in Ayurvedic text books. Though most of these are subjective, I hope that with experience and self observation, you can decide on yourself about the right quantity of food.

Further reading:
Why Did I Skip My Lunch Today, Though I Am Not On Fast?
How Many Time Should Kids Eat In A Day?
The Best Health Advice That I Would Give To Everyone

Dosha Relationship With Quantity Of Food

By Dr Raghuram Y.S. MD (Ay) & Dr Manasa, B.A.M.S

‘Too much is too bad’. This is a famous proverb that we all have heard many times. It is so true. This statement is applicable to everything in life in its true meaning. Haven’t we seen people die of excessive happiness?

But this statement is most applicable to food concept. Here, along with ‘too much is too bad’ we can also add up ‘too less is too bad’ in relation to food.
Read – Can Fruits Be Consumed With Meals? Ayurveda Explains

Dosha relationship with quantity of food

Less consumption of food and doshas

Food is nutrition and support for life. When we take less food, digestive fire does not get adequate fuel. Less nutritional juices are formed. Tissues are denied proper nutrition. Cells become hyperactive and cell fire becomes more due to want of nutrition. There are tissue burnouts because in absence of adequate nutrition, cells need to burn out to release energy for maintenance of day to day activities.
Read – Eating Etiquette: Healthy Eating Rules

As a consequence of tissue destruction lot of vacant space is created which nourishes air and ether elements in the body. This facilitates increase of vata which is also made up of air and ether elements.

Increased vata further causes destruction of tissues. Vata also kindles fire which is outrageous. Stomach and tissue fires become hyperactive and destroy whole body. Air, in form of vata and digestive fire in form of pitta located in body form a lethal combination.

Digestive fire digests food. In absence of food it digests doshas. In absence of doshas it digests tissues. In absence of tissues it digests prana i.e. life element and takes away life. Therefore it is extremely important to take food when one feels hungry.

Less food is not totally avoiding food. Fasting is a misunderstood concept. People indiscriminately fast for various reasons. One of strong reasons is to keep fit and healthy, to have zero size, to look slim and trim. This is not fasting, this is meaningless starvation. This leads to vata vitiation which makes way to many vata disorders.
Read – Vata Disorders (Vatavyadhi): Definition, Causes, Symptoms

Taking less food also causes diseases of insufficient nutrition. They are called apatarpanotta rogas.

Apatarpana = less nutrition

Rogas = diseases

Examples of diseases due to nutritional deficiency

  • Emaciation of body
  • Reduced digestion, strength, complexion, muscles, semen etc
  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Chest pain
  • Anorexia
  • Pain in heart region, calf, thigh, low back, bones and joints
  • Upward movement of vata
  • Many vata disorders

Excessive consumption of food and doshas

Excessive consumption of food is also not good for health. It also imbalances digestive fire and doshas and causes many metabolic disorders.

Guess putting a big heap of fuel on small quantity of fire. Does it ignite fire and make it intense? No, in fact fuel puts off fire. Similar mechanism takes place in our stomach. When we take large quantity of food, food puts off and weakens digestive fire, because it is out of capacity for that fire to digest large quantities of food.

When large quantity of food is partially digested by weakened fire, lot of undigested food is left over in stomach. This is expelled with difficulty and forms source for many disorders. Over a period of time if one gets accustomed to take large quantities of food, it continuously weakens digestive fire. This leads to indigestion and anorexia. These are root causes for many systemic disorders.

On other hand, due to weak digestion of food in stomach by weakened fire, intermediate products of digestion are formed in form of immature nutritional juices. This is called ama. It is a metabolic toxin.

Intestines are not programmed to absorb such unprocessed products of food. When they are absorbed in intestines, they reach heart and put into circulation. Owing to their sticky nature ama tends to stick to walls of cells and channels and produce multiple blocks. This hampers nutrition to tissues leading to tissue damage.

Weak digestive fire will impact on tissue fires and elemental fires and will weaken them also. Since tissues will not be capable of metabolising anything reaching them, intermediate products of tissue metabolism are formed. Cells will not be able to expel these products and over a period of time they get converted into tissue toxins and damage cells. All these events will lead to manifestation of many diseases, weakening of strength and immunity.

Apart from this, food taken in excess and consequential weak fire and digestion will lead to kapha increase in body. This will lead to many kapha disorders.

Taking food in excess also causes diseases of over-nutrition. They are called santarpanotta rogas.

Santarpana = over nourishment

Rogas = diseases

Examples of diseases due to over nourishment

  • Urinary disorders, diabetes
  • Blisters
  • Urticaria
  • Anemia
  • Fever
  • Skin diseases
  • Dysuria
  • Anorexia
  • Ama and Kapha diseases
  • Edema etc

So, one should take less food or more?

One should not take either less or more quantity of food. Food should be consumed according to one’s capacity but not to a point of saturation.

Digestive fire is not enhanced by fasting or by consuming food in large quantities. This is because, absence of fuel in form of food extinguishes existent digestive fire and excess of fuel extinguishes mild fire.

Need of taking food in right quantities

Most incurable diseases are produced due to improper food. So, an intelligent and self controlled man should consume conducive food in right quantity, and at right time to prevent diseases.

Benefits of food taken according to quantity

If food is taken in proper quantity, it prolongs life. This food will not aggravate doshas, in fact it will have them in balance.

Food will easily get digested and pass down to rectum. It does not impair digestion capacity. It gets digested without difficulty. Therefore food should be consumed in proper quantity.

Food consumed in proper quantity at proper time will enhance digestion as a rule. This depends on nature of food consumed, light or heavy foods.

Heavy foods should be consumed half of stomach’s capacity. Light foods should not be taken in excess. Amount of food consumed should be such that it gets easily digested.

How much food should one eat?

Master Charaka gives a simple mathematical solution to solve problem of ‘right quantity of food to be consumed’.

He tells that kukshi i.e. belly should be divided into three equal portions.

  • One third of belly should be reserved for solid foods.
  • One third of belly should be reserved for liquid foods.
  • One third of belly should be left vacant for action of vata, pitta and kapha.

If one consumes food in this pattern, he will not become victim of diseases and other bad impacts caused by improper consumption of food.

This shows that one should consume foods, including solid and liquid portions to three fourth of one’s capacity. Solid foods should be consumed to one third of one’s capacity and liquid foods to one third of one’s capacity. This capacity differs from person to person and between different body types.

Here term ‘kukshi’ should be taken as ‘stomach’.

This also explains that one third space in stomach is needed for action of doshas and doshas too take part in digestion of food. Therefore when less or excessive quantity of food is taken, balance of doshas is disturbed.

Click to Consult Dr Raghuram Y.S. MD (Ayu) – Email / Skype

23 thoughts on “How Much Food To Eat Per Day As Per Ayurveda?”

  1. Namaste,

    I heard elsewhere that the food consumption should be 1/4 stomach in the morning, 3/4 stomach in the afternoon and 1/2 stomach in the evening. Apart from this the pitta clock is also from 10am-2pm during day so does not we eat more during afternoon rather than morning as you mentioned in your article. Please clarify/advise.

    Reply
    • Hi, I have not seen such a reference about food consumption. Even if such an opinion / reference exists, I do not find it very reasonable.
      However, I agree to the Pitta dominant theory that, lunch can be bigger than the breakfast. Ultimately, one has to go with his habits, practices, his congenial things and hunger levels.

      Reply
  2. Dear Dr Hebbar,

    Namaste

    Good and useful article on consumption of food.

    I think the second line of 3rd paragraph should have negative connotation: “Lack of hunger while taking food indicates that the digestive enzymes are NOT optimum to the quantity of food taken.”

    Wish you well.

    Nitin K Parekh

    Reply
  3. Dr. Hebbar,

    I think the trick here is to understand “when are we completely hungry?”.

    We need to know this because then we will know when to eat.

    Best regards,
    Sriharsha Aswathanarayana

    Reply
  4. Dear Doctor,
    Why eating wheat is categorized under heavy food. These days all doctors at least in the south are advising the diabetic patients not to eat rice in the night instead prefer wheat. Then how wheat comes under heavy food. Please reply.
    with regards,
    Venkat

    Reply
  5. A scientific study says that it takes the mind to know the stomach is full only after 7 minutes after it has become full.So, never wait till you feel the stomach is full. Because by then you would have over eaten

    Reply
  6. Amount of breakfast > Lunch > dinner is proabably a westerm theory…My perception is that Ayurveda recommends light breakfast(DayTime Kapha Period), Moderate Lunch(Daytime Pitta Period), Light Dinnner(Daytime Vata Period) by dinner I mean Jain dinner before sunset
    Partically people have weak minds and bad changed habits due huge changes in lifestyle pattern in around past 100years
    Yet one can try to get closer to it

    Reply
  7. This is an unwritten principle of fulfilling our hunger. Since there are many articles and opinions, one normally gets worried and unable to decide which one is right – for example, heavy breakfast, light lunch and light dinner; OR eat intermittently as many times as possible. Both seem to contradict. What I understand is that bulging is in fact a result of overeating. Once overeaten, stomach tissues being flexible, they expand and increase the volume of otherwise normal feeding.
    It is therefore necessary to observe ‘SELF’ rule in matters of eating to be healthy.

    Reply
  8. Sir,
    I’ve heard that two meals a day are ideal as per ayurveda. One at 11 am and one at 7 pm just after sunset. Also came to know about many vedic gurukuls who follow this schedule.

    Reply
    • Please clarify further in the samhitas i have read it is ideal to have 2 meals a day in the morning and evening, but I was also told that you should have your main meal between 10 and 2 in pitta kala. So what is the correct number of meals. Also if you should eat within 6 hours then if you are waking early then how do you manage your number of meals. Are fruits and snacks not classified as meals?

      Reply
  9. Respected,
    Very informative article.
    I had a question….In Chapter 8th Ashatang Hardya verse 46 the author states that…1/2 of stomach is to be filled with solids,1/4 by liquids & remaining has to be left vacant for air…The question is how to determine the capacity of stomach?
    thanks a lot…
    Amit

    Reply
    • Hi, if we follow the below rule, then the 46th verse rule gets automatically taken care of –
      Ashtanga Hrudaya Sutrasthana 8/2 –
      As a general rule, if the food is heavy to digest (such as oily food, non veg, sweets etc), it should be consumed till half of the satiation level is achieved. (Ardha Sauhitya).
      If the food is light to digest, it should be consumed till one is not overly satiated. (Na Ati Truptata).
      The right amount of food is that, which undergoes digestion easily.
      Read the chapter here – https://www.easyayurveda.com/2013/04/03/ashtanga-hrudayam-sutrasthana-8th-chapter/

      Reply

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